View Gallery

Editions

Vanishing Point

A Novel

List Price: $15.95

January 13, 2004 | Paperback | 5.7 x 8.4, 208 Pages | ISBN 9781593760106
Order Now From Indiebound

"[Vanishing Point] rejects most of the trappings of conventional fiction. And still it delivers more narrative satisfaction than any number of painfully observed contemporary-realist novels do." —Washington Post

In the literary world, there is little that can match the excitement of opening a new book by David Markson. From Wittgenstein’s Mistress to Reader’s Block to Springer’s Progress to This Is Not a Novel, he has delighted and amazed readers for decades. And now comes his latest masterwork, Vanishing Point, wherein an elderly writer (identified only as “Author”) sets out to transform shoeboxes crammed with notecards into a novel—and in so doing will dazzle us with an astonishing parade of revelations about the trials and calamities and absurdities and often even tragedies of the creative life—and all the while trying his best (he says) to keep himself out of the tale. Naturally he will fail to do the latter, frequently managing to stand aside and yet remaining undeniably central throughout—until he is swept inevitably into the narrative’s starting and shattering climax. A novel of death and laughter both—and of extraordinary intellectual richness.

About David Markson

DAVID MARKSON‘s other novels include Wittgenstein’s Mistress, acclaimed by David Foster Wallace as “pretty much the high point of experimental fiction in this country.” Markson lives in New York City.

Praise

“[Vanishing Point] rejects most of the trappings of conventional fiction. And still it delivers more narrative satisfaction than any number of painfully observed contemporary-realist novels do.” —Washington Post

“Stunning…one of the strangest, most compelling books you will ever read.” —Reader’s Block

“With his seventh novel, Markson, an avant-garde favorite for works like Wittgenstein’s Mistress, which David Foster Wallace called “pretty much the high point of experimental fiction in this country,” proves once again that his trademark fragmental style yields boundless meditations on the mythologized lives of great artists and thinkers, as well as the somewhat hapless project of constructing and controlling a novel… Striking, devilishly playful (“If on a winter’s night with no other source of warmth Author were to burn a Julian Schnabel, qualms? Qualmless”) and with a deeply philosophical core, this novel proves once more that Markson deserves his accolades and then some.” —Publishers Weekly

“Following his last novel, the wryly titled This Is Not a Novel (2001), Markson offers another thought-provoking work that extends and challenges the traditional novel form by stringing together snippets of information ranging from quotes by artists and writers to trivia about historical figures to commentary on current news events… Vanishing Point feels a little like a literary Trivial Pursuit, or the associative stream of consciousness produced by a surrealist party game, and it’s just as entertaining. Markson deserves great credit for his literary experimentation, which will appeal to open-minded readers who welcome a fresh and witty approach to narration.” —Booklist

 

 

Related Products