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The Train in the Night

A Story of Music and Loss

List Price: $26.00

September 10, 2013 | Hardcover | 6 x 9, 304 Pages | ISBN 9781619021853
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“Coleman’s self-examination of his identity via music and his new interpretation of it are thoughtful and complex, recalling something of David Byrne’s rich How Music Works (2012)… A disquieting but ultimately resilient reflection on the sound and the fury.” —Kirkus

For thirty years Nick Coleman immersed himself in music, from rock’n’roll to “prog rock,” jazz to classical, until one morning as he sat up in bed, his right ear went stone deaf. His left ear—as though to compensate—started to make horrific noises “…like the inside of an old fridge hooked up to a half-blown amplifier.”

The Train in the Night explores the world in which a music critic must cope with a world that has abruptly lost its most important element, sound. But Coleman opens more than his struggle; he delves back into his past to examine how music defined his identity, how that identity must be reshaped by its loss, and how at time the memory of the music can be just as powerful as the music itself.

NICK COLEMAN was born in Buckinghamshire, England in 1960 and grew up in Fenland, England. He was Music Editor of Time Out magazine for seven years, followed by many years as Arts and Features Editor at The Independent and Independent on Sunday. He has also written for The Timesthe GuardianUS VogueGQ and many more — mostly about music. He lives in London with his wife and two children.

Praise

“Coleman’s self-examination of his identity via music and his new interpretation of it are thoughtful and complex, recalling something of David Byrne’s rich How Music Works (2012)… A disquieting but ultimately resilient reflection on the sound and the fury.” —Kirkus

“Coleman is remarkably adept at describing the moments of “hopeless disorientation” he experienced…He also provides hilarious and astute observations views of many of his albums, such as the Rolling Stones’ Goat’s Head Soup.” —Publisher’s Weekly Starred Review

“An engrossing read regardless of your musical sensibilities.” —The Denver Post

The Train in the Night is a memoir executed with considerable style and grit.” —The Millions

“It will cause you to appreciate your favourite music as if you’re hearing it for the first time, or the last.” —Andrew Mueller, New Humanist

“This is a book for anyone who grew up with pop music, listens to it still and has spent too much time thinking about it. But it’s also a book about love and loss and middle age and looming mortality, written with grace and the driest imaginable humour. I’m not sure I can recommend it highly enough.” —Marcus Berkmann, The Spectator 

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