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Late Nights on Air

A Novel

List Price: $14.95

May 1, 2009 | Paperback | 5.1 x 8, 384 Pages | ISBN 9781582434803
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“Hay’s spare, nuanced writing reflects the landscape of northern Canada... The novel unfolds as a long, lovely examination of how we learn to see ourselves in the places we choose to live.” —Associated Press

It’s 1975 when beautiful Dido Paris arrives at the radio station in Yellowknife, a frontier town in the Canadian north. She disarms hard-bitten broadcaster Harry Boyd and electrifies the station, setting into motion rivalries both professional and sexual.

As the drama at the station unfolds, a proposed gas pipeline threatens to rip open the land and inspires many people to find their voices for the first time.This is the moment before television conquers the north’s attention, when the fate of the Arctic hangs in the balance.

After the snow melts, members of the radio station take a long canoe trip into the Barrens, a mysterious landscape of lingering ice and infinite light that exposes them to all the dangers of the ever-changing air.

Spare, witty, and dynamically charged, this compelling tale embodies the power of a place and of the human voice to generate love and haunt the memory.

ELIZABETH HAY is the author of six other books, including Garbo Laughs and A Student of Weather, winner of the prestigious Marion Engel Award. A former documentary writer for the CBC, she lives in Ottawa.

Praise

“Hay’s spare, nuanced writing reflects the landscape of northern Canada… The novel unfolds as a long, lovely examination of how we learn to see ourselves in the places we choose to live.” —Associated Press

“Hay’s writing is so alluring and her lost souls so endearing that you’ll lean in to catch the story’s delicate developments as these characters shuffle along through quiet desperation and yearning.” —Washington Post

“Equal parts Northern Exposure and Lost in the Barrens, this novel… compellingly captures one of the many small moments in which the Canadian North began to lose its essence.” —Library Journal

“Great works of fiction are often great works of place… Elizabeth Hay has produced just such a novel… Hay writes with a keen insight into friendship, love, human frailty, and the isolation that we feel even when we aren’t alone.” —Outpost

“Hay portrays the tender bonds that are forged (and broken) in such wild places… Nothing seems to escape her. This is Hay’s best novel yet.” —The Walrus

“Psychologically astute, richly rendered and deftly paced. It’s a pleasure from start to finish.” —Toronto Star

“Elegiac… exquisite… Hay creates enormous spaces with few words, and makes the reader party to the journey, listening, marveling, breathing, fearing.” —Globe and Mail (Toronto)

“Invites comparison with work by Alice Munro and Margaret Atwood.” —Times Literary Supplement

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