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I Was Trying to Describe What It Feels Like

New and Selected Stories 

List Price: $18.95

ON SALE: December 12, 2017 | Paperback | 5.5 x 8.25, 400 Pages  | ISBN 9781619025936

“There is always a visceral sense of something wild and untamable beneath the surface of Holland’s stories, moving her characters through scenes and moving plots toward sharp conclusions.” —Booklist

Noy Holland is one of America’s great writers, and each of her previous collections has been greeted with wide acclaim. Critics have praised her exquisite prose, her exuberant characters, and the exhilarating tension of her tales.

Following the wonderful reception of her first novel, Bird, which Counterpoint published last year, we are proud to offer a gathering of 44 stories, 14 from her previous collections and 30 never before published in book form.

NOY HOLLAND is the author of Bird: A Novel as well as three story collections, Swim for the Little One First, What Begins with Bird, and The Spectacle of the Body. Recipient of fellowships from the NEA, the MacDowell Colony and the Massachusetts Cultural Council, she teaches writing in the graduate program at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Praise

“A treasure trove… Holland’s prose makes the familiar seems strange and the strange seem familiar.” —ELLE

“There is always a visceral sense of something wild and untamable beneath the surface of Holland’s stories, moving her characters through scenes and moving plots toward sharp conclusions.” —Booklist

“None of the stories in the collection are formulaic, and none of them are easy. Rather, they’re sneaky, enigmatic, revealing themselves to the reader at unexpected times, sometimes long after the last word has been read…I Was Trying to Describe What It Feels Like is a strong collection, and Holland’s writing is by turns hallucinatory, bizarre, and maddening in the best possible way.” —NPR

“These new and selected stories testify to the fact that there are still fine short story writers out there, doing the hard job of serious literary production in our age of tweets and memes…Holland’s language is challenging, elliptical, bristling with sensations and resounding with the interior lives of complicated, recognizable people.” —New York Times Book Review

 

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