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Left Out in the Rain

Poems

List Price: $15.00

January 10, 2006 | Paperback |  5.5 x 8.25, 224 Pages | ISBN 9781593760908
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“The reading is something like archeology, sifting the layers that have built up over the years to find the source of a familiar voice... Left Out in the Rain shows us the footsteps in the wet meadow grass...” —Los Angeles Times

Inspired by the ancient Chinese proverb, “There’s nothing you can own that can’t be left out in the rain,” this collection charts the journeys of the poet from 1947 to 1985. This book is unique among Gary Snyder’s numerable works, and the poems contained here are as broad in style as the compilation is in timeframe. With a new introduction by the author, Left Out in the Rain captures the evolution of the poet and the man.

Readers will travel with Snyder from the American West to the Far East. From Berkeley to Kyoto, his imagery provides insight into the natural world as well as the human experience. With the span of a few words, Snyder can reveal a universe and then two pages later deftly handle a villanelle. Sensual, sardonic, meditative, epigrammatic, formalist—whatever the tone or structure, these poems all bear the indelible stamp of a master. Always evocative, they remind us why Snyder is one of our most heralded and beloved contemporary poets.

About Gary Snyder

GARY SNYDER is the author of sixteen collections of poetry and prose. Since 1970, he has lived in the watershed of the South Yuba River in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1975 and a finalist for the National Book Award in 1992, he has been awarded the Bollingen Poetry Prize and the Robert Kirsch Lifetime Achievement Award.

Praise

“The reading is something like archeology, sifting the layers that have built up over the years to find the source of a familiar voice . . . Left Out in the Rain shows us the footsteps in the wet meadow grass . . .” —Los Angeles Times

“A fascinating case study and verse autobiography of a man who long ago staked his claim as one of America’s finest poets.” —Boston Herald

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