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Kundun

A Biography of the Family of the Dalai Lama

List Price: $20.95

September 2, 1998 | Paperback | 6 x 9, 416 Pages | ISBN 9781887178914
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"[Craig's] specialized book may appeal mostly to those deeply interested in Tibetan Buddhism, but the information provided is comprehensive and difficult to find elsewhere." —Library Journal

Kundun is a story of reincarnation, coronation, heartbreaking exile, and finally, the tenacious efforts of a holy man to save a nation and its people. This is the first work to focus on the Dalai Lamas family—his parents, four brothers, and two sisters. Particularly compelling are Mary Craigs portraits of the Dalai Lamas siblings, who have negotiated with China on behalf of their country, enlisted the aid of international allies to spearhead Tibetan Resistance, and worked tirelessly to help thousands of sick and starving refugee children. This remarkable book opens in 1933 with the death of the thirteenth Dalai Lama and the frantic effort among Tibetan authorities to find his reincarnation. In their search for a baby boy displaying the characteristic marks of a Dalai Lama—tiger striped legs, wide eyes, large ears, and palms bearing the pattern of a sea shell–officials were led to a tiny village in northeastern Tibet, home of Lhamo Dhondup, a smart, stubborn toddler already known for his tantrums. Responding calmly when a group of high lamas and dignitaries tested his memory of a previous life, the child easily recognized a rosary, walking stick, and drum belonging to the thirteenth Dalai Lama at the age of three, and was known from that point on as His Holiness or Kundun (the Presence), titles even his family members were obliged to use. A few years later the young Dalai Lama and his family were faced with Chinas invasion of Tibet. Living in exile since the late 1950s, they have waged a decades-long struggle for the freedom of their country.

Kundun brings new warmth and insight to one of the centurys most heartrending stories, the epic of a people wrenched from their land by force and stubbornly fighting for survival.

MARY CRAIG is a journalist and a British writer. She lives in Hampshire, England. 

Praise

“[Craig’s] specialized book may appeal mostly to those deeply interested in Tibetan Buddhism, but the information provided is comprehensive and difficult to find elsewhere. Recommended for libraries serving readers with a strong interest in the Dalai Lama.” —Library Journal

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