View Gallery

Editions

Among Friends

List Price: $15.00

March 30, 2004 | Paperback | 5.5 x 8.25, 320 Pages | ISBN 9781593760243
Order Now From Indiebound

"Food is what she wrote about, although to leave it at that is reductionist in the extreme. What she really wrote about was the passion, the importance of living boldly instead of cautiously..." —San Francisco Examiner

In Among Friends, M. F. K. Fisher begins her recollections in Albion, Michigan, but they soon lead her to Whittier, California, where her family moved in 1912, when she was four. The “friends” of the title range from the hobos who could count on food at the family’s back door to the businessmen who advertised in Father’s paper—but above all they are the Quakers who were the prominent group in Whittier. Mary Frances Kennedy found them unusual friends indeed, in the more than forty years that she lived in Whittier she was never invited inside a Friend’s house.

Her portraits of her father, Rex—her mentor, himself the editor of the local newspaper—her mother, Edith, and the other members of her family are memorable and moving. Originally published in 1970, Among Friends provides a fascinating glimpse into the background and development of one of our most delightful and best-loved writers, Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher.

M.F.K. FISHER wrote twenty-six books, including A Cordiall Water, Last House, and How to Cook a Wolf. Widely known as the woman who elevated food writing to a literary art, she was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and received lifetime achievement awards from the James Beard Foundation and The American Institute of Wine and Food.

Praise

“If I were still teaching high school English, I’d use [Fisher’s] books to show how to write simply, how to enjoy food and drink but, most of all, how to enjoy life. Her books are one feast after another.” —Frank McCourt, author of Angela’s Ashes

“I do not know of anyone in the United States who writes better prose.” —W.H. Auden, author of The Age of Anxiety

“Food is what she wrote about, although to leave it at that is reductionist in the extreme. What she really wrote about was the passion, the importance of living boldly instead of cautiously; oh, what scorn she had for timid eaters, timid lovers, people who took timid stands, or none at all, on matters of principle.” —San Francisco Examiner

Related Products